Do I Have To Give The Police My Details?

What happens if you refuse to talk to the police?

No.

You have the constitutional right to remain silent.

In general, you do not have to talk to law enforcement officers (or anyone else), even if you do not feel free to walk away from the officer, you are arrested, or you are in jail.

You cannot be punished for refusing to answer a question..

Do police need a reason to pull you over NZ?

If an officer has good reasons to believe that you’re incapable of properly controlling the vehicle that you’re in charge of and that it is necessary for your safety or that of the public, they can stop you from driving.

Can you refuse to give police your name?

The police must provide the name and place of duty of the officer performing the search. They must also tell you the reason for the search. If you do not comply with the search you may be committing an offence.

Can I refuse to give my details to police NZ?

If you’re driving, you have to give the police your name, date of birth and address. If you refuse, you can be arrested.

Why do police ask for name and date of birth?

A: Cops have reports to write. Among the information they are required to get are: Name, Address, DOB, and Phone #. It is often easier to copy that from your ID. In some agencies, the report is rejected to the officer if all the boxes aren’t completed.

Can police charge you without evidence?

It’s wrong for a person to be convicted for an offence without thorough reasoning, therefore solid evidence is needed before a decision is reached. … In fact, you can be charged simply with the intent to commit offences, or if there is reason to believe that you were involved in a crime.

What to say if a cop asks how fast you were going?

This means when an officer asks you questions such as “do you know why I stopped you,” you should respond “no.” If the officer asks you “do you know how fast you were going,” you should simply answer “yes.” Officers are trained to let you incriminate yourself by letting you admit to violations or admit that you were …

Can police track your phone?

The digital age has provided a host of new issues with law enforcement, many of which deal with the intersection of privacy rights and criminal law. In short, police cannot track cell phone location data without a warrant. …

Can the police ask where you are going?

A police officer or police community support officer (PCSO) can stop you and ask you to account for yourself. They may ask what you are doing, why you are in an area, where you are going, or what you are carrying. … An officer does not need a reason to stop a person driving, or attempting to drive, for a routine check.

On what grounds can police detain you?

Police Detainment The police can detain you when they have a reasonable suspicion that you have committed a crime. While no set time limit exists, police are only allowed to detain you for a reasonable period while they conduct an investigation. During the investigation, they will likely try asking you questions.

Do you have to tell a police officer your name?

For example, Nevada has a statute requiring giving your name to an officer, but California does not. … No federal statute requires identifying oneself to federal law enforcement officers, and immigration officers do not have authority to enforce state criminal laws like Hiibel statutes.

What is illegal for cops to do?

Types of misconduct include: coerced false confession, intimidation, false arrest, false imprisonment, falsification of evidence, spoliation of evidence, police perjury, witness tampering, police brutality, police corruption, racial profiling, unwarranted surveillance, unwarranted searches, and unwarranted seizure of …

Why do cops ask for your name?

They can ask about your name, address and age, or request your I.D. The police must have a reasonable suspicion – meaning a clear, specific and unbiased reason for suspecting that you committed, are committing, or are about to commit a crime. They cannot stop you simply because you “look suspicious.”

Can you refuse a police interview?

It is really important to remember that you have a right to refuse to do a police interview. … Your right to silence is found under s89 of the Evidence Act NSW 1995. It is the law. You can tell police that you do not want to be interviewed.