Quick Answer: What Is The Reporting Of Injuries Diseases And Dangerous Occurrences?

What is the Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013?

From 1 October 2013 the revised Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR 2013) come into force.

RIDDOR is the law that requires employers, and other people in charge of work premises, to report and keep records of: work-related accidents which cause deaths..

How do you report dangerous occurrences?

Accident and Dangerous Occurrence ReportingOnly fatal and non-fatal injuries are reportable. … Fatal accidents must be reported immediately to the Authority or Gardaí. … Non-fatal accidents or dangerous occurrences should be reported to the Authority within ten working days of the event.More items…

Why do dangerous occurrences need to be reported?

Information on accidents, incidents and ill health can be used as an aid to risk assessment, helping to develop solutions to potential risks. Records also help to prevent injuries and ill health, and control costs from accidental loss. … any reportable death, injury, occupational disease or dangerous occurrence.

What is a dangerous occurrence?

These dangerous occurrences apply to all workplaces and include incidents involving, lifting equipment, pressure systems, overhead electric lines, electrical incidents causing explosion or fire, explosions, biological agents, radiation generators and radiography, breathing apparatus, diving operations, collapse of …

RIDDOR puts duties on employers, the self-employed and people in control of work premises (the Responsible Person) to report certain serious workplace accidents, occupational diseases and specified dangerous occurrences (near misses).

What is the difference between an accident and a dangerous occurrence?

An accident can be described as any unplanned event that results in: injury; or ill-health; or damage to or loss of plant, materials, etc. … All accidents are ‘incidents’. However, the definition of an incident is wider in that it includes dangerous occurrences and ‘near misses’.

What is a reportable incident?

Reportable Incidents (RI) An RI is an event or situation involving a risk or threat to a person’s health or safety that includes, but is not limited to: 1. Emergency relocation: The need to relocate an individual to an alternate location, other than his/her primary residence, for 24 hours or more.

What are the typical accident reporting procedures?

How Do I Report an Accident at Work?Step 1: Check there is no immediate risk of danger. … Step 2: Ensure that the colleague receives the appropriate medical assistance as necessary. … Step 3: Report to a manager or supervisor. … Step 4: Record the incident in the company’s log. … Step 5: Report the incident under RIDDOR.More items…•

Why do we report near misses?

Reporting a near miss can ensure that future incidents and injuries are avoided. This can help organizations reduce the costs associated with workplace incidents, such as medical expenses, workers’ compensation payments, time lost due to injury, accident investigation costs, and equipment replacement costs.

What is reportable to HSE?

Accidents must be reported where they result in an employee or self-employed person being away from work, or unable to perform their normal work duties, for more than seven consecutive days as the result of their injury.

What are the 3 categories reportable under Riddor?

Reportable injures There are seven different categories of RIDDOR, and these are: deaths, specified injuries, over seven day injuries, injuries to people not at work, some work-related diseases, dangerous occurrences and gas incidents.

What is not a reportable incident?

Firstly, the injury must be the result of a RIDDOR reportable accident. This means that the accident causing the injury must be work-related. Accidents outside of work are not reportable. In relation to RIDDOR, an accident is defined as a separate, identifiable, unintended incident, which causes physical injury.